The Popup: A Marketing Tactic We Love to Hate By @lkpetrolino

The Pop-up: A Marketing Tactic we Love to Hate

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By Laura Petrolino

The use of website pop-ups is a marketing tactic we communications pros love to hate.

Like really hate.

The same way Gini Dietrich (and as we have now learned, Rosemary O’Neill) hates broccoli.

Or how I hate to touch velvet or be stuck in dimly litrooms (let their be light people).

And we aren’t the only ones.

The general public tend to hate when we use pop-ups as a marketing tactic, too. When I was researching keywords for this post, almost all of the Google suggestions were along the lines of “how to block pop-ups,” “blocking pop-ups,” “stop pop-ups.”

You see the trend.

And yet……

When done in a smart way (we will get to that later), theywork!

Case-after-case show pop-ups used effectively as a marketing tactic help drive more subscribers (such as how Darren Rouse increased subscribers by 300 per day ), and increase conversions and leads.

Like most marketing tactics, there are several ways for one to “pop a box.”

They can be triggered:

Itreads like a list of “how to be super annoying and make people yell horrible things about you at their computer.”

And yet….

They work!

Ok, that might be an exaggeration (but a killer sub-head, right?).

I’m about to tell you a true story of pop-up victimhood, and why I now get emails every morning into my inbox that look like this:

One day I clicked over to an article on Playboy while doing research for another blog post (I really was there for the articles) and this pop-up flashed up on the screen:

It was clever,funny, and exactly what I was thinking at the time, “I’m on Playboy, reading the articles.”

So it worked.

And now I receivea daily email from Playboy—which does actually have some fairly good articles.

Source: SpinSucks